Everything You Need To Help Your Dog Find Balance

August 5, 2014 by  
Filed under Dog Training Tips, Featured

No-one is about to claim that helping a dog find balance is an easy thing to do. Dogs are animals with personalities, and whether or not those personalities are amenable to domestication, they will present different challenges with each different dog. It cannot be denied that some are easier to help find balance than others, but no dog is beyond help. It is simply the case that some dogs need to be given more of a chance than others to pick up what their master wants them to learn. After all, humans are the same – if you got straight As in your freshman year of high school, congratulations, but you are in a minority.

So it makes sense that there is help that can be found to improve the behavior of a dog you are finding hard to re-balance. As ordinary “civilians” when it comes to the overall behavioral patterns of a pet dog, it goes without saying that we will not magically have access to the “button” inside a dog’s mind that makes it behave well, perform tricks or anything else you want it to do. There are professionals who have written books and made DVDs showing helpful tips and hints, and a wealth of websites which do the same.

You may even take your dog to a professional who will be able to identify ways to get it behaving the way you would like.

Call Nature Aligned Canine today for professional dog behavioral assistance. 214-434-4408

You Reap What You Sow

August 5, 2014 by  
Filed under Dog Training Tips

Dogs in general are driven to follow their innate instincts when responding to outside influences. Canine behavior itself is the one thing that has given many dog experts a compelling reason to write countless books about the world of dogs. As far and wide as you may go, you are unlikely to find an expert who advocates an aggressive manner in addressing dog behavior issues. A very good reason for this is that one of dogs’ strong instincts is to absorb what they are taught very quickly, and behaving aggressively towards a dog will influence it to behave in an equally aggressive manner. Deep down in every dog, are the same instincts wolves have; since all dogs are descendants of the wolf.

If you were to find a wolf in the wild and were to take an aggressive posture towards it, the wolf will not back down. It is likely to go for the kill and not stop until either you or it can no longer fight. Although domestic dogs have lost something of that instinct and ferocity, there is still yet buried deep within the dog the tendency to react with aggression when it is backed into a corner by anyone. If a dog is kicked or hit, it may back down once or twice. However, if you repeatedly strike the dog, it will react with aggression toward you.

Give a dog fun, exercise, and affection and it will reciprocate that behavior toward you. Its instinct is to form a bond with its owner and to do anything it can to please them. Use this instinct to your advantage, and watch your dog blossom into one you can be proud of.

Call Nature Aligned Canine today for professional dog behavioral assistance. 214-434-4408

I’m Not Sure I Like Your Tone…

August 5, 2014 by  
Filed under Dog Training Tips

Adressing behavior issues with a dog is a practice which makes big demands on an owner. There is a lot of effort involved in ensuring that a dog behaves well, and each person will have their own views on which methods are the most effective and efficient. What is certain is that each dog will react in its own way to different stimuli. One of the most effective tools in keeping a dog on its best behavior is the human voice – make sure your dog gets used to the sound of yours, because this is how you will get the best out of it.

As humans, we are used to recognising the tone of each other’s voices. We have become so good at this that we almost don’t need to hear a person’s words in order to know what they are saying. A warning tone, a praising tone, a cheerful tone… each is recognisably different to us, and it will be recognizable to your dog too. In this respect, you can teach your dog well by allowing it to recognise what you are saying, without having to teach it a command.

Speaking in the correct tone need not even take practice. Usually, your emotions take control of your tone of voice, and skilled liars have to work to keep their tone even – so allowing your genuine tone to come through should be simple. The dog will come to recognise the cadence of what you say as much as the actual command – and it will be this that they come to associate with good and bad behaviors and their consequences.

Call Nature Aligned Canine today for professional dog behavioral assistance. 214-434-4408

Spoiling Your Dog – How Far Is Too Far?

August 5, 2014 by  
Filed under Dog Training Tips

Most pet owners will confess, if asked, to the fact that they do spoil their pet in terms of treats, feeding and cuddles. There is certainly no shame in this admission, in fact most of us would agree that it gets right to the heart of the matter – spoiling pets is half the reason for having them in the first place. Of course, this refers to “spoiling” in the sense that your pet is given treats regularly and made a fuss of. Sometimes spoiling can go too far, and lead to another kind of spoiling altogether.

A dog will respond to treats in exactly the way you wish it to, as long as you stick to the straight and narrow with how you distribute treats. If you hand it a treat every hour or more, it will simply see this as standard behavior. Its own behavior will become fairly lazy and it will have little incentive to display the behavior you had come to hope for. Treats can be given just for the sake of it, but they cease to be “treats” in any real sense once they become the norm.

You should keep a keen eye on how frequently you give your dog a doggy-chew or a bit of food unbidden. These treats can play a major part in how you work with your dog, and if a morsel of food is just another bite to eat in a long day of eating and relaxing, it will grow lazy and not bother much with tricks and behavior, which is a shame for all concerned.

Call Nature Aligned Canine today for professional dog behavioral assistance. 214-434-4408

How Your Dog Will Communicate With You

August 5, 2014 by  
Filed under Dog Training Tips

So many people speak about their dogs in terms of how they wish they were. If you had a dollar for every time you had heard or said the words “If only he/she could talk, the stories we would hear…” you’d probably be a very rich dog owner. But if dogs could talk, would they be so special to us? The chances are that we would still adore them every bit as much as we do, but the fact remains that much of what we get from owning a dog comes from the interaction that we have because they cannot speak. It just means that we find other ways to communicate.

Dogs can tell you a lot with a look. If they are hungry, they will make it clear by very patiently following you and looking pointedly at where they know their food to be kept. They will then thank you for feeding them by wagging their tail and affectionately nuzzling you – which may or may not be welcome at the time depending on the ratio of dog slobber to the price of your outfit. But, in many ways, the truth is that your dog will teach you to some extent, while you are working with it.

Dogs may not be able to talk, but they communicate a lot with their eyes, their tail and their body language. And of course, they will bark. We learn to read these barks. A short, sharp bark will often signify excitement. A deep, low growl will warn of danger or threat. For many owners, the inquisitive yip is the best of all – the dog wants to learn from you, and trusts you to teach it.

Call Nature Aligned Canine today for professional dog behavioral assistance. 214-434-4408

Steer Clear of Over-Punishing Your Dog

August 5, 2014 by  
Filed under Dog Training Tips

There are some people who feel that fear is the best motivator – period. If you want someone to act in a certain way and eschew other behaviors, you will often use the “stick” approach. This works in a fairly simple way – you make clear what you want to happen, and threaten negative results if the outcome is not to your taste. If the outcome then falls short of what you had hoped, you follow through with your threat. The person then becomes aware that your threat was genuine, and resolves to take you seriously.

The same process is often applied to working with a dog. If the dog transgresses in some way, it will be punished. Often this will take the form of a physical punishment such as striking the dog. If this method is applied frequently enough, it will filter through that the behavior and the punishment are linked. Eventually, or sooner, the dog will make the link in its brain and cease the negative behavior. However, it may also come to see you as its punisher rather than its friend.

The key is to not over-punish your dog. It is simply not accurate to say that fear is the greatest motivator. Anyone who has seen the effects of excessive physical punishment on a dog cannot fail to see how the results can be hugely negative. It may resist the instinct to transgress, but equally it will not want to do anything at all. And a dog which behaves well, but loses its vitality, says more about its teacher than anything else.

Call Nature Aligned Canine today for professional dog behavioral assistance. 214-434-4408